Carbon Monoxide Monitors

In response to the many carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings and some CO-related deaths, W.B. Steward & Son has become certified in Carbon Monoxide Safety and
Combustion analysis. Finally there is a local expert for the community to deal with CO related problems and provide prevention services.

Most consumers know very little about carbon monoxide gases and their causes. For example:

      • Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas formed in the process of incomplete combustion of fuels.
      • Carbon monoxide (CO) is a gas that can build up to dangerous concentrations indoors when fuel- burning devices are not properly operated, vented, or maintained.
      • Because it has no odor, color or taste, CO cannot be detected by smell, taste, or sight. It is estimated that acute CO poisoning contributes annually to more than 2,000 deaths in the United States. (Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)) In addition, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates that 8,000 to 15,000 people each year are examined or treated in hospitals for non-fire related CO poisoning. Breathed over long periods of time, low concentrations of CO may also contribute to other illness.
      • Fortunately, simple measures can be taken to prevent CO problems. One such action is the installation of a CO alarm to detect potentially deadly conditions.
      • In general, CO is produced when any material burns, but more is produced when there isn’t enough oxygen for efficient burning. Common sources of CO in homes include fuel-burning devices such as furnaces, gas or kerosene space heaters, boilers, gas cooking stoves, water heaters, clothes dryers, fireplaces, charcoal grills, wood stoves, lawn mowers, power generators, camp stoves, motor vehicles and some power tools with internal combustion engines.
      • CO concentrations indoors are expected to be the same as CO concentrations outdoors (typically around one to two parts per million parts of air (ppm) or less).
      • Breathing low concentrations of CO (5-30 ppm) may not result in obvious symptoms of CO poisoning, yet long-term
        exposure can still adversely affect health. At low concentrations, CO poisoning is easy to overlook because the symptoms are non-specific and your symptoms may come and go if CO concentrations change quickly.
      • The best way to prevent CO poisoning is to make sure your fuel-burning appliances are operating, venting and maintained properly, and by installing a CO alarm.

CarbonMonoxideOccupiedSpace
W.B. STEWARD & SON NOW PROVIDES CARBON MONOXIDE & COMBUSTION RELATED SERVICES.
The smartest way to confirm there are no dangerous levels of CO gasses in your home is to have a complete home CO check by a certified contractor. During the process your contractor should check every combustible appliance using a properly calibrated Carbon Monoxide Analyzer. Your contractor should also be checking for correct chimney draft on your fireplace, furnace and water heater.

INSTALLING A LOW LEVEL CARBON MONOXIDE MONITOR IS THE BEST PREVENTION OF FUTURE HAZARDS
Once all appliances have been checked and received a passing grade the smartest follow-up step is to install a carbon monoxide alarm.

As with most consumer products CO alarms are not all alike. Most don’t alarm until levels of CO have reached a highly hazardous level. Typically, store bought detectors, while less expensive, only provide life-or-death protection for normally healthy adults.

The correct type of CO monitor is one that will detect levels of Carbon Monoxide at 5ppm or higher. This is especially important to families with elderly, children of any age and those with respiratory and heart problems. W.B. STEWARD & SON can install a professional grade low-level CO monitor that is designed to provide protection for all ages and medical conditions.

CO is lighter than air. Monitors should be mounted at eye level and no lower. They should be placed in an area with good air circulation. If you have only one monitor it should be placed near the master bedroom. Additional locations include your kitchen, nursery, basement, rooms with fireplaces or gas logs, and near your heating system and/or hot water tank. Your professional installation contractor will determine the best location in your home.

Carbon-MonoxideLevels

Low-Level Carbon Monoxide Monitor (National Safety Institute Model 3000)

The NSI 3000 Offers Real Protection:

      • Continuous Scan ™ mode lets you know monitor is checking for CO – 24/7
      • Digital display shows CO levels of 5ppm or higher
      • Low Alarm – 15 ppm – audible & visual every 8 seconds
      • High Alarm – 35 ppm – audible & visual every 4 seconds
      • Crisis Alarm – 70+ ppm – audible & visual every 2 seconds
      • 5-minute “Hush” button for levels below 70 ppm
      • Designed for wall installation or tabletop use
      • Replaceable 9V battery ensures operation even when power is out

True Protection for all ages!

      • Provides protection for all age groups and conditions, especially infants, children, the elderly, and highly sensitive or ill people. Other detectors barely provide minimal protection for healthy adults.
      • Lets you know there’s a problem before reaching dangerous, even deadly CO levels, long before the other detectors even begin to work.
      • NSI’s Model 3000 Monitors employ the same electrochemical sensor technology found in professional CO Analyzers that cost thousands of dollars. These monitors
        are calibrated using CO, not electronic guesswork!

One-of-a-Kind-CO-Monitor-from-W

Facts you should know to protect your family

Why do I need a low-level monitor?
The NSI low level monitor senses CO levels as low as 5 ppm (parts per million). Infants, children, elderly, persons with respiratory or heart ailments are
provided little or no protection from deadly CO with standard alarms. Longterm exposure to Low-level CO above 15 ppm can cause illness and even permanent disabilities.

What about the other “detectors” sold at retailers and home centers?
Store-bought detectors don’t alarm until unsafe levels of 70 ppm or higher are present at the unit for 3-1/2 hours! By then it may be too late. Plug-in models don’t always allow for proper placement and don’t work during power outages. The NSI 3000 is battery powered for 24/7 protection.

Why is the NSI 3000 more expensive than the others?
Accurate, low-level CO detection requires more expensive components & quality control. The NSI 3000 CO monitor uses the same technology and sensors as in professional-grade CO analyzers used by contractors, fire departments, and utilities. And NSI’s unique Continuous Scan mode lets you know the monitor is operational 24/7!

How many monitors should I have in my home?
As with smoke detectors, you should have one monitor installed on every level of your home. Even a single-story home may need two – one at each end.

Where should I place the NSI monitor?
CO is lighter than air. Monitors should be mounted at eye level and no lower. They should be placed in an area with good air circulation. If you have only one monitor it should be placed near the master bedroom. Additional locations include your kitchen, nursery, basement, rooms with fireplaces or gas logs, and near your heating system and/or hot water tank. Your professional installation contractor will determine the best location in your home.

What should I do if my monitor goes off?
Call your CO-Certified contractor at any level below 70 ppm, unless you have symptoms. CO exposure can cause nausea, severe headache, shortness of breath, chest pain, blurred vision, and dizziness. If you experience these symptoms ca11911 and leave the house immediately. Above 70 ppm, evacuate immediately. If you have symptoms, ca11 911 from a neighbors house. Call your utility to turn off the equipment until your CO-Certified contractor can investigate the source of carbon monoxide.

CarbonMonoxideMonitorComparison